2020 Lincoln Homecoming Will Celebrate Lincoln Centennial

2020 Lincoln Homecoming Will Celebrate Lincoln Centennial

The seventh annual Lincoln Homecoming will celebrate the centennial of the founding of the Lincoln Motor Company to build passenger cars. The Homecoming will be held August 6 – 9 at the Lincoln Motor Car Heritage Museum and Research Center in Hickory Corners, Mich. The Homecoming will be pre-ceded by optional “pre-Homecoming” events in Dearborn, Mich. on August 2-5.
The Lincoln and Continental Owners Club will host the 2020 Lincoln Homecoming. The LCOC and members of the Home-coming committee have spent months developing a special schedule of events. Co-chairs of the 2020 Homecoming events are LCOC members, Dennis Garrett and Bob Johnson.
It must be emphasized that participation in most of the tour-ing events is limited; when they’re full, they’re full. Registra-tion is now open; updates will be posted on the Lincoln Motor Car Foundation web site—www.LincolnCarMuseum.org. A new online credit card processing feature is added as another way to register in 2020. Our online registration system will be up-dated with the status of all activities and banquets when sold out.

“If ever there was a year to bring your Lincoln to a Homecom-ing, this is it,” said David Schultz, chairman of the Lincoln Motor Car Foundation. “We encourage Lincoln owners to bring their cars in any condition—restored, original, partially restored, or somewhere in-between. We want to see Lincolns on display.”
Every Lincoln owner is encouraged to attend and display their Lincoln. To be judged on the show field, you must be a mem-ber of the appropriate four Lincoln clubs sponsoring this Homecoming, which you can join while when registering for this meet.
The fun begins in Dearborn on Sunday evening, August 2, with a cocktail party at the host hotel, the historic Dearborn Inn, built in 1929 by Henry and Edsel Ford as an airport hotel.
On Monday, August 3, several tours will be offered: the Edsel and Eleanor Ford House, the original Ford Piquette factory, and the Lincoln Continental assembly plant in Flat Rock, Mich. Din-ner will be on your own that evening.
On Tuesday, the Monday tour schedule will be repeated, with the added tour to the Detroit Historical Society and the Muse-um Motown. That evening there’ll be a gala dinner inside The Henry Ford Museum. Attendees may tour the museum from 6 to 11 p.m. The guest speaker will be Joy Falotico, President of the Lincoln Motor Company and Ford Motor Company’s chief marketing officer.
On Wednesday morning, all Lincolns in attendance will gather at Ford World Headquarters for a display that will last into ear-ly afternoon. Attendees may enjoy lunch at the Ford Motor Company cafeteria and visit the Ford/Lincoln gift shop. Follow-ing lunch, attendees will depart for Hickory Corners and the host hotel, the Four Points by Sheraton Kalamazoo.
Thursday and Friday will be driving tour days. The committee has scheduled several interesting tours: the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum, a cruise on Lake Michigan departing from Saugatuck, the historic village of Marshall, the Vicksburg Historical Village, and the Kalamazoo Air Zoo.
On Thursday evening, there’ll be a “Welcome” buffet at the Four Points by Sheraton Kalamazoo hotel.
On Friday evening, there’ll be a cocktail reception for all Homecoming attendees at the Lincoln Motor Car Museum and Research Center, followed by a banquet and the traditional auction of Lincoln parts and memorabilia to benefit the LMCF Endowment Fund.
The big day will be Saturday—a display of 100 years of Lin-colns adjacent to the Lincoln Motor Car Heritage Museum and Research Center. All four Lincoln clubs will have cars on display and will do their own judging. That evening, a gala dinner will be held, at which time awards will be presented. Tentatively scheduled to speak that evening is Jim Farley, Ford Motor Company’s Executive Vice President and President, Global Mar-kets. Several Lincoln and Ford executives are also expected to attend.
On Sunday, the celebration will continue with a display of all Lincolns on the grounds adjacent to the Lincoln museum, with a parade of Lincolns on Gilmore Car Museum grounds.
Our host hotel in Dearborn is The Dearborn Inn-Marriott, 20301 Oakwood Blvd, Dearborn, MI 48124. This hotel offers excellent rooms and fine dining in an urban oasis spanning 23 landscaped acres. The room rate is $164 plus tax. A limited

number of rooms are available at this rate; please reserve rooms and register early. To make room reservations, you must call 313-271-2700 and use the code “Lincoln 100” to ob-tain this special rate. Room reservation cut-off is July 1. Trailer parking is available in a separate hotel lot during your stay.
Our host hotel in Kalamazoo is the Four Points Sheraton by Kalamazoo, 3600 E. Cork Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49001. This hotel offers excellent accommodations, fine dining, and exceptional amenities. The hotel is just over 15 miles from Hickory Corners. Complimentary hot breakfast for two is in-cluded in your room rate of $120.00 plus tax. To make room reservations, call 269-385-3922 and use the code “Lincoln Club” to get this special room rate, which is good for three days prior to and after the meet. We have added a second hotel, the Holiday Inn Express, 3630 E Cork St., Kalamazoo, Michigan. The room rate is $120. Call 269-373-0770 and use the code “Lincoln Club” to get this special room rate. Room reservation cut-off for both Kalamazoo hotels is July 1.
Detailed information on the 2020 Homecoming will be available in January 2020, including the day-by-day itinerary and registration forms, which will be published on the LMCF web site—www.LincolnCarMuseum.org. For more information, con-tact Bob Johnson, e-mail: arbortbob41@aol.com, or call 651-257-1715.

LCOC Show Cars Celebrate Continental Nameplate’s 80th Anniversary at LCOC’s Eastern National Meet (Part 1)

LCOC Show Cars Celebrate Continental Nameplate’s 80th Anniversary at LCOC’s Eastern National Meet (Part 1)

LCOC Show Cars Celebrate Continental Nameplate’s 80th Anniversary at LCOC’s Eastern National Meet (Part 1)

Nine decades of Lincolns and Continental models graced the show field at the LCOC Eastern National Meet held in September at the Culinary Institute of America, Hyde Park, N.Y.  From Tony Russo’s 1927 Model L roadster to Erling Onsager’s 2018 Continental some of America’s finest luxury vehicles provided a kaleidoscope of colors and styles covering nearly all eras of Lincoln history.  What an impressive sight!

Beautiful first-generation Continentals were among the most admired entries along with John Talbourdet’s ’37 sedan and Danial Falco’s ’41 Zephyr. Others were Paul Wilson’s ’40 Continental, Tony Rosso and Franklynn Koehler’s ’41 Continentals and Bruce Anderson’s ’46 Continental.

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Rare and elegant ’56 and ’57 Mark IIs, a ”59 Mark III and other ’50s Lincolns delighted spectators. James Dunn’s ’55 Capri and Rusty Rentsch’s ’56 Premiere were there as was William White’s ’59 Mark III, Walter Blankenship and Dave Kirkpatrick’s 54 Caprils were shown along with ’56 Mark IIs owned by Peter Mann, Kenneth Lewis, John Keesee, Lawrence Durocher, Joseph Armstrong, and Keith Collana and ’57 Mark IIs owned by David Kraus and Edward Avedisian. Below are some prime examples of these coveted vintage cars.

Several iconic slab side Continentals of the 1960s—both sedans and convertibles—were on hand for the fun.  Among these were Mid-Atlantic Region host Owen Clarke’s ’63 convertible, Wayne Sawyer’s ’63 sedan, Jeanne Talbourdet’s ’67 convertible, and a ’66 Lehmann-Peterson limo owned by Joe Columbe. Ray Mastronuzio’s ’65 Continental was on display along with David Moyer’s ’66 convertible. See below.

Seven Decades of Lincolns Starred at LCOC Western National Meet Car Show

Seven Decades of Lincolns Starred at LCOC Western National Meet Car Show

Seven Decades of Lincolns Starred at LCOC Western National Meet Car Show

Great cars and scorching Colorado weather added sizzle to the centerpiece car show of the LCOC’s 2019 Western National Meet in Grand Junction. But triple digit temperatures failed to wilt the enthusiasm of  LCOC members on hand to show off their beauties. Eight decades of Lincolns and Continentals made it to this year’s meet, with cars from the 1970s and newer predominating—perhaps because they were equipped with A/C?  No matter, all that were on the show field were spruced up and looking their best!  

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Tim Moore of Richmondville, NY was selected as the applicant with the “Best New Home”

Tim Moore of Richmondville, NY was selected as the applicant with the “Best New Home”

Tim Moore of Richmondville, NY was selected as the applicant with the “Best New Home” for the 1978 Lincoln Continental featured in our LCOC website Classified Ads promotion. The goal of the current owner, William Green, was to find the best home possible for the vehicle, and he entrusted that task to the LCOC.

Tim became hooked on Lincolns as a teen while mowing lawns for a local businessman, Richard Falzarano, in a small town in upstate New York. After Tim’s work was done each week, Richard would give him a ride home in his 1978 Lincoln Continental sedan. It was gray with light blue interior, and riding in it made Tim feel like a million bucks. While he hoped to one day own one, he had to settle for a 1972 Buick Electra as his first car. However, that vehicle allowed him to appreciate American iron from an era where luxury and performance had an entirely different meaning than it has in most cars driven today.

Tim’s love of Lincolns continued to grow over time. Earlier this year he built a new 10-car building that his family affectionately calls the “Garage Mahal.” Once it was completed, he finally had the type of shop/garage he dreamed about for years. It enabled him to purchase his first classic, a 1967 Lincoln Continental convertible in Spanish Moss with a Dark Ivy Gold interior. It has given him great pleasure to give the car the attention it deserves, and he plans to repaint it during the winter. For him, the car is not only an engineering marvel, but also a work of art.

That venture has also brought a surprising benefit: Tim’s 23 year old son, Nick, has been bitten by the Lincoln bug, too. They have spent quite a few hours working on the ’67 which his son admires “because it’s so classy and well built.” He now loves attending shows with Tim and is making plans to have their current Lincoln in two parades next year. Because it seems as though many young people do not have much interest for older cars, Tim feels fortunate that his son has found a passion that provides such a positive influence on him. He is excited about the prospect of them having two Lincolns in shows next year.

The Moores are delighted to provide a home for the 1978 Lincoln. It will have a place of honor in the Garage Mahal. Having the tools and expertise to handle most repairs and preservation, they will immediately undertake a complete servicing: replacing all fluids; checking out/rebuilding the carburetor; draining and cleaning the gas tank; changing the filters; changing the valve cover gaskets and others as needed; and assessing the underside of the car.

Tim is very familiar with this particular car model, and believes that the 82,000 mile engine and the “bullet-proof” C-6 transmission should be okay for the short term. Tim’s basic plan is to make this car a beautiful, fully-functioning original. He believes that the original condition of this car is worth maintaining. He plans to take the car to shows, use it in several upcoming family weddings, and just drive and show the world what original American Iron really is like.

Although intrigued by those who specialize in customization, Tim cannot find any justification for taking wonderful original cars and significantly changing them. Tim shares, “Owning older cars allows me and others to step back to a different place and time when driving meant something very special. It would not be responsible to take that away from future generations by altering cars.” William Green’s 1978 Lincoln Continental has definitely found a terrific home with Tim Moore and his son that insures its legacy will be shared for years to come.

Editor Emeritus Tim Howley Feted by LCOC

Editor Emeritus Tim Howley Feted by LCOC

LCOC presented Tim with a plaque and a framed Board resolution lauding his contributions during his 35 years as editor.

Tim Howley was the editor of Lincoln & Continental Comments since 1982, producing more than half of the Comments issues in the 64 year history of the club! He was recently named Editor Emeritus, giving him the freedom to continue contributing his talents and experience for our reading pleasure. On March 18th, the LCOC National Board, represented by Glenn Kramer and Stacy Roscoe, honored Tim and his wife, LaVonne, with a luncheon and a small awards ceremony.  

Glenn and Stacy took the opportunity to thank Tim on behalf of the club and enjoyed listening as Tim recounted some of his experiences as both editor and advertising copy writer at several national ad agencies. Tim conceived and created many long remembered TV, radio and print ads for such clients as Pacific Southwest Airlines (PSA), Mother’s Cookies and Canon Cameras. His career in advertising and editing has been memorable and long lasting.

LaVonne was also thanked for all her hard work with an engraved vase and flower arrangement.

The ceremony and lunch continued for well over two hours, and after final good-byes, Glenn and Stacy agreed that this enjoyable day of shared stories was fascinating and more importantly, that LCOC is most fortunate to continue having Tim and LaVonne on our team.